Farming

Opened:
Put together by: Ryedale Folk Museum

About the collection
Ryedale and the North York Moors have been farmed for thousands of years, and have seen particularly significant developments in the last century. Rural farming communities often go undocumented, so these photographs give an interesting insight into the lives of ordinary people who lived in and around Hutton-le-Hole.
2008-5-4240

Items within the collection

Ploughing
Date: 1930s
Info: Rosedale

Caption:

Horse drawn ploughs were the only method of ploughing a field prior to the popularisation of tractors. The backdrop to this photograph is Chimney Bank in Rosedale, and the iconic chimneys can still be seen at the top of the hill.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-228
Washing Sheep
Date: 1910
Info: Hutton-le-Hole

Caption:

Sheep washing involved fully immersing the sheep in water, usually to clean them in the weeks leading up to shearing. Many villages and parishes had traditional sites for sheep washing, usually in local rivers or at natural pools. Here we see the site used by local farmers at Hutton-le-Hole.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-414
Driving Cattle
Date: 1928
Info: Harome

Caption:

A farm worker drives his cattle through the main street at Harome. St Saviour’s Church can be seen in the distance.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-1199
Sheep Dipping
Date:
Info: Farndale

Caption:

Five men are shown in the process of dipping sheep. This meant plunging the sheep into water that contained pesticides, in order to protect them against insects such as ticks, lice and blowfly. The dip could take the form of a permanent in-ground structure or be a mobile assembly, as can be seen here.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-1678
"Allowance Time"
Date: 1948
Info: Hutton-le-Hole

Caption:

‘Allowance time’ was gladly accepted by the hard workers at Oxclose Farm, pictured here during a Threshing Day. Threshing is the process of separating corn from its stalks. The stalks can then go on to be straw, animal feed, bedding or thatching. The corn tended to go on to be ground into flour.

Photograph by Raymond Hayes

2008-5-2034
Ploughing with Shires
Date: 1950
Info: Ryedale

Caption:

Two white shire horses are pictured here ploughing a field that looks out onto Ryedale and the Vale of Pickering. They are followed by a man working the plough. One aspect of this photograph that shows it was perhaps staged is the horses’ feet – working shire horses would have had their wispy legs trimmed to stop them getting too muddy.

Photograph by Raymond Hayes

2008-5-2407
Sheep Shearing
Date:
Info: Ryedale

Caption:

Mechanical shearing was developed towards the end of the nineteenth century, but the practice of shearing by hand continued to be used. It was especially prevalent in smaller flocks or in particularly rural areas. Our sheep on site receive their annual fleece-cut by hand.

Photograph by William Hayes

2008-5-2741
Feeding the Chickens
Date: 26 June 1914
Info: Farndale

Caption:

This photograph provides an insight into daily life at Harland Farm. Everyone would have been expected to be involved in the running of the family farm, it was not solely the role of the man of the house. Traditionally, women often helped in the dairy with cheesemaking. Even the children would have been expected to help with farm chores, such as feeding the hens and geese.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-3676
Milking Time
Date:
Info: Ryedale

Caption:

Milking by hand was the only option up until the late nineteenth century, when the process was mechanised. However, it took a number of decades for this to become the norm, and for rural areas with small herds the practice of hand milking continued well into the twentieth century.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-3677
Haytime
Date: 1920
Info: Farndale

Caption:

J. and W. Featherstone are here pictured with their hay cart and horses on Tenter Hill. The process of making hay started with cutting the grass, leaving it to dry out, and occasionally turning it by hand with a rake. It was then gathered up, as can seen in this photograph. Haystacks were then formed, where the hay could be left to compress and dry out.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-3687
"Feeding Time"
Date:
Info: Lastingham

Caption:

Two women are pictured feeding their flock of hens, wearing Victorian dress, and keeping a close eye on their black cat! Much like cows and sheep, chickens were also herded on foot. It was not uncommon to see large flocks of the birds being walked from village to village.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-3705 take 2
Harvesting Rosedale
Date:
Info: Rosedale

Caption:

This photograph of harvesting in Rosedale shows the different stages of the gathering process. To the right of the image a man can be seen with his scythe, cutting down the corn. Men can also be seen collecting up bundles, otherwise known as a sheaf. In the background, these sheaves can be seen piled together to allow them to continue to ripen and keep dry.

Photograph taken by William Hayes

2008-5-4651